Saturday, January 1, 2011

2010 Ford Focus to Boast Torque Vectoring System

2010 Ford Focus

Ford has announced that they are planning on introducing a torque vectoring system in the 2012 Focus, a technology that is intended to increase the vehicle’s stability during cornering.

Ford says that this exclusive torque vectoring technology will improve the car’s handling and driver confidence. When accelerating through a corner, the system will apply a small dab of the brakes to the inside front wheel, so that more engine torque goes to the outside wheel, allowing for better corning and improved traction.

“Torque vectoring control elevates the dynamic capability of the entire Focus model range, from an S series sedan through a Titanium Sport Package hatchback,” said Rick Bolt, program manager for the 2012 Focus.

These new technologies in small cars have been in Europe for quite some time, but new regulations in the United States are forcing automakers to bring them across the pond. New fuel regulations and government mandated safety equipment have pushed car companies to develop fun to drive small vehicles.

"Torque vectoring control elevates the dynamic capability of the entire Focus model range, from an S series sedan through a Titanium Sport Package hatchback," said Bolt, an automotive enthusiast, frequent road course track-day participant, instructor, former Sports Car Club of America racer and – not surprisingly – downhill skier.

"Because torque vectoring control is on all our Focus models, it will elevate skill sets across a broad range of drivers," Bolt said. "The new Focus is differentiated from other vehicles in the segment by style and design, the technology it contains and the superior driving experience it provides."

There are numerous other vehicles that are equipped with something similar to this system, such as the Volkswagen GTI. Yet, in the GTI, the system can overheat the brake pad during aggressive use. Ford's new system should solve this issue.

The new 2012 Ford Focus will go on sale in early 2011.

source: torquenews